Rachel King's Featured Appearances

Interviews

Special Guest Expert - Rachel King: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Expert - Rachel King: this mp4 video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Brian Kelly:
So here's the big question How are entrepreneurs like us who have been hustling and struggling to make it to success, who seem to make it one step forward only to fall two steps back? Who are dedicated, determined. And driven. We finally breakthrough and win. That is the question. And this podcast will give you the answers. My name is Brian Kelly. This. Is the Mind Body Business Show. Hello, everyone, and welcome. Welcome, welcome to. The Mind Body Business show. Oh, my goodness. We have one of the most interesting, intriguing guests I've had in a long time. Such a great background. I'll let her tell it, because it's very interesting what she has been through, what she has done and where she is now in her life, in business and personal life. It's phenomenal and full of energy. Amazing young woman. I cannot wait to share her with you. Her name is Rachel King. I cannot wait to bring her on. But before we do that, the mind body business show, it is a show that I had built with you in mind. And I mean that you, the entrepreneur, the business owner, the one trying to get to that next level in their business. And what happened was, over a course of about a decade, I began studying just successful people, really focused on just successful people and trying to figure out what is what is it about them or was it about them If they had passed on that made them more successful than someone like me. And I continued to work with mentors like side by side physically. One mentor I worked with for several years, others that I have done joint venture partnerships, others that are authors of books, some living, some no longer with us, and some passed before I even started reading the book. And throughout all of this, what I noticed were three things kept trickling up to the top and becoming very noticeable. And you might guess what those three things are. I call them the three pillars of success, and that is mind, body and business. And for mine that means each of these individuals to a person had developed a very positive, very powerful and most importantly, a very flexible mindset.

Brian Kelly:
And then with body, they also took care of themselves, both physically and nutritionally. That one is straightforward. And then business. Business is very, very multifaceted. And what that entailed was these individuals, again, to a person, had mastered the skill sets that are necessary to build a successful business and grow and keep scaling and thriving. That business skill sets like sales, marketing, team building, leadership, systematizing. I could keep going on and on and on. In fact, systematizing. Oh, that's a whole subject in its own right. I almost went off on a tangent, but I'm not going to stay focused. Brian Here we go. Yes. And the cool thing is. To master any one thing of any kind of thing. But a skill set in particular can take a very long time. I think it's said that to become an expert in anything takes 10000 hours of focused effort. I mean, 10000 hours, that's a long time. And I just rattled off, what, four or five skill sets and there are many more. You're probably thinking, well, Brian, forget this. I'm not going down the business, Right? I'm not going to be an entrepreneur. The good news is, though, you don't have to master every single one of them. In fact, if you focus on just one of them and it was one of the one of the few I just listed in just a moment ago, if you just mastered one skill set, what can happen is you can leverage that skill set to bring in others in your business who have already mastered or are in the process of mastering the other skill sets that you have yet to or may never do. Just time on Earth and how long it takes you may never master. And that one skill set is Wait a minute, is anybody curious? Do they want to know what it is? The shortcut to success. I don't know if it's that important to you. All right, I'll stop teasing. It is the skill set of I need a drum roll, like a soundbite right here. I keep saying that every show and I forget to go grab one. It is the the skill set of leadership.

Brian Kelly:
And for those of you that might be saying, you know, Brian, I'm a solopreneur. Who am I going to lead? How am I going to learn that? Well, first, I'd say start reading books on leadership. There are several great ones out there. I will go over those at this moment. We have plenty coming up on a resource I'm going to show you in just a minute. And then the other thing is start leading yourself. Get in the habit of leading yourself, become disciplined, start putting things on calendars. How would you treat yourself? If you're an employee, Start thinking as if you were one of those people because you're directing everything you do every day. So if you're not disciplined with yourself, will you be disciplined with someone else? And you can start developing those skill sets before you start bringing on a team? That is a perfect example. And all right, speaking of very successful, people were going to move on because another phenomenal trait I found out about nearly every successful person I've ever run to run into is that they are also very avid readers of books. And with that, I want to segue very quickly into a little segment I affectionately call Bookmarks.

Announcer:
Bookmarks. Going to read bookmarks. Ready, Steady. Read bookmarks brought to you by reach your peak library.

Brian Kelly:
Yes. And don't worry, Rachel King is coming on. I mean, she's she's in the back just scratching on the screen saying, let me in. You should see. It's pretty neat. And she cannot wait. Yes. Reach your peak library dot com. That is a website that I had built with you in mind. And once again, this is really a gift to you. And before I go into this, a real quick word of, I guess caution or instruction or coaching maybe, is that rather than go off and look at these resources, live in real time while the show is on, especially when Rachel comes on, rather than do that, write down the web addresses and the resource names, maybe books, write them down and then visit them after the show is over. And why do I say that? It's because of we just touched on it. Focus. You want to be focused on what? Especially what Rachel is going to say, because I've spoken from stage many times. I've seen someone get up and leave the room. They had to go to the bathroom or they had that all important text right at the moment where I was about to give a secret to success. It's not really a secret, but a big heavy hitting point. And I felt bad for them and I thought, I don't ever want that to happen again. And so I know this isn't a physical stage, but the magic happens in the room. So stay in the room, stay focused. And when Rachel comes on, you don't want to miss a moment and take take very gracious notes as well. I take notes and I'm running the show, so I don't ask of anything of you that I won't myself do. So reach a peak library dot com is a website I literally had put together by my team with you in mind. And what it is is I'm now 58 years old. I did not start reading voraciously until the age of 47 and I did not know what kind of incredible impact it could have on me in my life. And once I began reading, I was like, wow. And I couldn't get enough.

Brian Kelly:
And so these are all the books I have personally completed reading that had a profound impact on either my business or my personal life or both. And that's what I put in this library. Reach your peak library. Remember, write that down. And why did I do that? Because not every book that I've ever read is in here. It gives you the higher probability of getting a good read and not wasting your time. That's the main reason. It's efficiency. I've already read it. I know if it's good or not for me, I have a business. And so I thought, Hey, I think this will be beneficial to others. So your quick, quick guide to books that will really have an impact on your especially your business life more, more so than personal life. But a lot of them do go cover and go and cover both because business and personal relationships are very similar. All right. That is reach your peak library. Ooh, there goes. My voice dot com. And so. With that, it is finally time to bring on the one and only Rachel King. So let's do it. Here we go.

Announcer:
It's time for the guest expert spotlight, savvy, skillful, professional, adept, trained. Big league.

Brian Kelly:
Qualified. This is, ladies and gentlemen. It is the one. The only Rachel King. Yes.

Rachel King:
Thank you. Thank you.

Brian Kelly:
Welcome to the show. My goodness. Ladies and gentlemen, you are going to be blown away with her background. And we'll get into that in just a minute. And I don't mean to be a tease to either of those watching or listening or you, Rachel, but we do have some bookkeeping or housekeeping, I like to say, to take care of. So a few. Quick. Words from our sponsors and then we'll get back to the show real, real quick. So sit tight, watch this, take notes and then get ready, get settled in, because Rachel King is going to come right back. Here we go. Hey, if you're watching the mind body business show live right now, then you will have the ability to win a five night stay at a five star luxury resort of your choosing, compliments of the big insider Secrets. What is it? It is a five night vacation Stay to one of many destinations across the world. You can see as we go through this very quickly, there's some in Branson and Daytona Beach. These are in the United States, all over the United States, New Orleans, San Diego. There's also Mexico. There's also the UK and Argentina. I mean, it just keeps going on and on and on. Australia, at the end of this show, you will be given the ability to enter, to win. You must be watching this live. If you're not watching live, then head on over to the mind body business show and register to receive automated notifications when we go live the next time. We do not spam, we do not even pitch any products or anything from that notification. It's just simply a way for you to know that we're alive. And now you can join us and you can also participate in this incredible, incredible prize. And you do not want to miss this. So come on live. And you do not want to miss a moment because of our incredible guest experts and stay on to the end. And we will reveal that at the very end. And. If you're struggling with putting a live show together and it's overwhelming and you want a lot of the processes done for you while still enabling you to put on a high quality show and connect with great people and grow your business all at the same time, then write this down.

Brian Kelly:
Carpet bomb marketing dot com. Then head on over to it after the conclusion of tonight's show. Carpet bomb marketing saturate the marketplace with your message and to get a free lifetime membership to a phenomenal resource called the Reach P Club. Your free membership will include instant access to deep discounts on major software services and top shelf training courses that you need to run your successful business. Think of it as your entrepreneur. Discount house. Catapult your business to the next level. Sign up for free now and get a hotel discount card worth $200 just for joining. Then go and grab your deep discount. So write this down. And then after the show once again head on over to reach your peak Club Dotcom. All right, now let's get back to the show. Oh, right. Rachel is a serial entrepreneur starting at the age of 12. This work ethic and drive at an early age led to seven years of, Oh, I love this part. Military service. We're going to get into that. Utilizing the discipline skills to move forward with owning multiple businesses, Rachel acquired the desire to continue expanding her talents. The passion for law was instilled in her from birth, from her father's law career, so she followed in his footsteps, opening her law firm in 2014. The combination of entrepreneurship, discipline, training and an understanding of law allows her to be the rising leader for California, Arizona, Texas and Kentucky, with her firm practicing litigation of family law, probate and real estate matters. Alongside her impressive career, she is a proud wife and mother and loved by her community for her continued service in outreach. Finally left officially and formally. Welcome to the show, Rachel King. How are you doing tonight?

Rachel King:
Thank you. So nice. It's fun to hear about all of the things that I've done because I don't often hear about it. So thank you for having me. And what a wonderful introduction.

Brian Kelly:
Oh, my goodness. And I'll say this publicly. I said it behind the scenes, but thank you for your service. Thank you for your husband's service in the Army. And I appreciate both of you for making you know, I look at it as a sacrifice because you could have chosen so many other things. And when you go into the service, you don't really have your own life. You're told what to do, when to do and how to do it most of the time. And so thank you from the bottom of my heart. And I know that everybody watching, listening embraces that as well. So mad respect for you and your husband both. So thank you very much for doing that.

Rachel King:
Oh, it was really one of the best times in my life and I wouldn't be here today without it. So really, I'm honored to have served.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah. And I cannot wait. We'll get to it in a moment, but I cannot wait to see how that has spilled over into your business and personal life as you've gone, as you left the service and see what it did. I've heard some great stories from those who have served. I have not heard one bad story. I'm not saying that bad things didn't happen, but I haven't heard the bad story about what they utilized that experience, how they did in taking their life to the next level. So I'm very excited about this. What I wanted to do is find out in the very beginning what I love to start out with. The first word of this show is mine, and it's what I my opinion is that the mind, our mind set is the foundation, the cornerstone, the reason of either our level of success or lack thereof. It has nothing to do with anyone else outside factors, no one else's fault. We are where we are today because of what's going on up here. And what I want to do is get inside your big, beautiful brain. Rachel Not physically, of course not. But you have.

Rachel King:
To wait post mortem for that.

Brian Kelly:
So yeah, wait for then. But I wanted to find out because, you know, running your own business is not always the easiest thing to do. In fact, it's often a challenge nonstop each and every day that are things that, you know, that's why we are entrepreneurs, because we we solve problems, solve issues. So for you, when you get up every morning and you know what's ahead of you, maybe there's an arduous task or a client you don't really want to deal with, but you have him or her and you just know that there are things that are not aren't going to be just rosy and great and fun all day. When you wake up in the morning, what is it going what is going on in your beautiful brain that is keeping you positive and moving forward and driven and productive day in and day out as you go through your business?

Rachel King:
Being an entrepreneur, owning a business is can be so overwhelming, right? You just constantly, even when you're not. Things can be overwhelming. I. And you touched on it earlier. Actually, I kind of live and die by my calendar. So when I feel overwhelmed or when I feel like I the week is so much or the day is going to be way longer than I wanted. I look at my calendar or I go back and I remember it and I just take one meeting at a time or one thing at a time. If I have to be at the office for an 830 appointment, then let's just get to the office for the 830 appointment. Let's not look at the 6 p.m. board meeting. That's, that's too much. And I really am a believer in just bite size pieces. You take off what you can and once you've done one thing, it's much easier to do the next. So I that's kind of how I get out of bed every single day is taking on one task at a time.

Brian Kelly:
Wow, that is just profoundly intelligent and interesting. It is so weird. Rachel. I just literally had conversations with people about a similar concept, and this seems to happen. I'll have a conversation with somebody about it, and then the next guest expert like you, we'll talk about it. I'm like, It's crazy. Yeah, because I have a dad with advanced dementia. He's 86 and he was getting scammed and it was a horrible there was a two month solid two month stretch of absolute stress and not knowing, you know, there were so many things going on that we had to take care of my brother and I. And I just kept telling him because it's the only way I could deal with it was we just we only thing we can do. This is one step at a time.

Rachel King:
100%. Like I say that, I say it in every aspect of my life. I was hiking yesterday and we were going up a really big hill and I looked at my littlest daughter and I was like, So it's just one step at a time till we get back to the end of this. Like whatever it is you're facing, even if it's fun things, it can be overwhelming. Just get to the next step. And I almost give myself permission, Brian, to just do that one step and then say, And then you don't have to do anymore, right? When I get really wrong, then, then you've done it and you don't do anymore. And I've found as many people have, that once you do that, that first thing, it's easy to keep going. So if you just really give yourself permission to handle what you can in that exact moment, but do it, it can make huge tasks that are so overwhelming, life just doable.

Brian Kelly:
It's gosh, same. Another it's about, you know, you take that first step and that creates momentum. Yeah. And then you continue. So it's like how many times everyone out there listening, including you, Rachel? Like, how many times have you been, like, just exhausted. Maybe you're on the couch and it's like, Oh, I forgot. I need to go and clean up the dishes or something. And you're just no way. It's not happening. But I know if I wait till the morning, they might give off an odor. I better take care of this. Right? And then it's like, oh, begrudgingly you get up and sludge on over to the sink. You start cleaning the dishes you get. You look over on the counter like, Oh, that looks a little dusty. I'm going to go clean that off. And then you walk through the house. Oh, these clothes. I should pick those up and fold them. But you've already started the momentums there. And now, before you know it, the whole place is clean.

Rachel King:
Absolutely everything is that way like, and it seems. But if you had thought sitting on the couch, I'm going to go and do the dishes and get the laundry done and sweep it like you would just not do any of it right. You would be like, I'm not going to get off the couch. That's too much. I'm tired. But if you just give yourself permission to do one thing and you do it and then not do anymore, it really does. It's the momentum kind of keeps you going. And then it's just these little, little things that when you're done, you're like, Wow, my house is clean, My laundry started. Like, This is amazing.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah. And then you feel great, right? And you're. Awake. It's like going to the it's like exercising, you know? Oh, my God, I'm so tired. I don't want to go to gym. Then you go in about maybe 20 minutes into it. You feel better than you have in weeks if you haven't been in for a while. It's just it's an amazing thing, is just do it. Do something, but keep moving in whatever direction you want to go in and stack those pebbles, as they say. And it's like what they say. The metaphor about how do you eat an elephant one pebble at a time or one back on the pebbles. Oh, we have some people saying hi. Oh, I wonder who this might be. Amy Scruggs. She says, Amazing having Rachel today. Thank you, Amy, for referring this amazing young woman to us. Miss April's dance says Hello, Brian and Rachel King. I love it. Lori Ann Hood. Oh, she's like a regular. I love her. Lauryn Hood is here from South Carolina. And oh, look at that. We got some cheering going on. Amy Scruggs Woo hoo! Lauryn Hood Oh, this is nice. Flattering. She's beautiful. Yes. Thank you. And then Marie Bernard totally sitting on the couch. Yes. Thank you. Oh, that's. Fantastic. Yeah. And it truly is like it's almost the secret to success. It's just moving forward one step and then other steps. Your other leg just seems to pass it in. Take another step. And then another one. And then another one. But it's just that first one that seems so arduous.

Rachel King:
It is. And throughout my life I was in law. I had children, young, I was in law school. I always had kind of too much to do. And quite frankly, I was always too tired. And the only thing that I could find because I had to figure out how to do it. So what I really did find, whether it was working out or anything, is letting myself be okay with only doing that one step, knowing subconsciously that once I do that step, it'll, it'll keep going. But if you really are okay with it, it's actually quite easy to get up and do one thing. And when you know that, well, now I can get back on my couch, it makes it easier to get that get off the couch. Right.

Brian Kelly:
So, yeah, I have a good friend, Christopher Roush, who just interviewed me recently and talked about that too. And he would say something like, you know, he plays a guitar, but he hasn't picked one up in a long time. And he said, I just tell myself, I'll just I'll just pick it up. I may just hold it for 15 minutes. I may not even pluck a string, but then it starts happening. Same with going to the gym. He tells his clients, Go to the gym. All you have to do is go there, take a picture of the front door. Prove to me that you went there and we're good for that day. So of course they're going to get to the door. Open the door. Go in. All right, I'll do a set of this. And then before, you know, 20 or 40 minutes of a workout is ensued. And so it just works.

Rachel King:
It does. When I do running, when I go running, I'm a runner. So when I get up in the morning, it's cold or it's rainy or I'm just tired, or this time of year it's dark and I think I'm just going to go really slow, like as slow as I need to. And I will only go for like one minute. Like I will just run for one minute as slow as I need to. So like, I don't even break a sweat. And then it's like, Oh, I can do that. And then by the time yeah, then it's like, well, it feels kind of nice. I have my running shoes on. I'm like, Oh, keep going.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah. So that's it. There you go. That's the secret to success. Our show is over. So long. Pretty really.

Rachel King:
Do it right. Nike had it from the get out the gate.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah, that was one of the best advertising slogans in history, I think. My goodness. Yes. And so one of the things I liked or that I opened the show with and mentioned was the importance of reading. It had a profound effect on me when I finally pulled up my big boy pants and started reading, I just didn't like looking at pages. I didn't know this, and I read when I was told to in school and stuff. I just did it, but I didn't enjoy it. And I learned that once Audible came out that listening to books was my jam. So I started listening to him like crazy and. It did have a massive and profound effect on me, but I didn't start till the age of 47. I don't look back and go, Oh gosh, I wish I'd started earlier, but there's a reason for it all. And I got different life experiences as a result. Would you consider yourself to be an avid reader, and if so, what kind of things do you read to to fuel your entrepreneur mind? Or do you like to read things that are fiction and get some entertainment out of it? What's your what's your role with that?

Rachel King:
So actually, I'm a literature and writing major, so I am a very avid reader. I've been reading and writing and that is my degree. I've read all the classics and I continue to read. But that all aside, because like many college students, I didn't actually care for everything I read in college. I have I just read. I read every single day. It is what puts me to sleep. Like I get in bed and I have a read like I read, and then I go to sleep all the time. There's not a day that goes by in my life that I don't read, and I actually switch between nonfiction and fiction. So sometimes I like to read the nonfiction, but I read a lot of kind of complex. Material for my job. So I keep my nonfiction actually kind of light. I. I loved the book Born to Run. It was like one of my absolute favorites. I read the recent New York Times bestseller Breathe that was also has made my top Life books. So for nonfiction, I try and keep it light and how I can improve myself. And then the fiction that I like is historical fiction. I'm just a big fan of historical fiction. I think it's. Interesting. You can keep it light adds a little bit of drama, but for the most part you're learning something. And I love to read.

Brian Kelly:
That's fantastic. I mean, I can liken that to movies like I work all day. I'm a former software engineer and I did a lot I wrote a lot of software for the DOD as a contractor to the DOD. And so we have a little bit of a connection there, you and I and your and your husband, which is cool. But that was that took a lot of of of the brain every day. I mean had to think and solve issues at a. Kind of. I don't know if I'd say high level, but it was always solving something, writing the software. When I got home, I'm like, I want to shut the heck down. You know, my wife would pull up a movie and I'm watching them like, did you did you pull up another movie where we have to think. To follow it?

Rachel King:
Oh, my gosh. Yes. I've said that so many times. Why are we thinking so much on TV?

Brian Kelly:
I just want something to entertain me and to chill. And we get. Like 20 minutes into it. I said so. I'm lost. What's going on? Because I'm not listening. I do not want to do that. I just want to relax. And she always laughs at me. And she'll. She'll get perturbed and posit and then bring you up to speed. Oh, okay. Thanks. And then play it. So when I said 20 minutes later. Okay, so what about this one? Where are we now?

Rachel King:
So let me just stop with that, because I haven't really been paying attention. Is this where we're at? I, I watch stupid TV. I'll be if I can say that I, my husband will watch the shows that are always rated top and you hear on all the social media that are great and he'll want me to sit down like this takes so much brainpower, like I have to follow this case in order or there's whatever the show is about. Can we have something that I don't It doesn't matter what happened 10 minutes ago. I can pick it up right here. And and that's I think why I like reading is because I can read it. If I don't really pay attention, it's okay. I can pick it up and it'll kind of all weave itself together the next day. Or I can reread the two pages that I didn't get the night before.

Brian Kelly:
Or just or just decide. Maybe it wasn't interesting enough. I'm just not. I'm just going to put it away and never open it again. I can't.

Rachel King:
Do that. Once I start, I'm like, Oh, I feel so guilty if I don't finish, so I'll just jog through it until it's over. And then I'm like, Oh, that was not a good book. What a waste of time.

Brian Kelly:
But yes, we have a lot of similarities there. I'll tell you this. I kind of think I know the answer to the next question I want to ask you, because you you briefly touched on one of the things you do on occasion or on a regular basis, which is running. And I like to cover some of the topics under mind. Body business don't have to cover them all. And then I want to get into your military background next after this one. I'm so intrigued by that. And I'm just curious for you and I, I know the answer for me and everyone else I've talked to has a similar answer, but I love to hear it and and the variation of it. How important is physical fitness to you in not just your personal life, but what have you noticed if you are doing it on a regular basis, what does it do for your business as well?

Rachel King:
I run or do something? Well, I call it intentional exercise every single day. And I define intentional exercise as not like going on a hike or a walk with my kids or walking my dog. That is life. But intentional exercise is something that I've specifically set out to do to improve my physical fitness. And I do something every day, even if it is as simple as like the most basic laying on your back yoga. And it does two things for me. I work out in the morning. It acts as my caffeine, so I don't actually drink caffeine and I really use the exercise or whatever I'm doing to get me awake. It starts my day. It's kind of my opening statement for the day and it sets the tone. It also makes me feel like I've done something productive already. So I've entered the day having done something really good, and if the rest of my day I don't do anything or it doesn't go well, at least I. I was successful for the first part. But I also really use running and exercise for my mental health. My job is super stressful I'm dealing with. People's problems all the time. And legal problems are probably one of the most stressful times in any one person's life. And I'm carrying that and I'm trying to make it so that it doesn't. So we have the best possible outcome. So in order to get rid of some of that stress, to be functional so that I can think strategically, I need to have that mental escape I don't like I don't run with other people typically. It's like a very independent activity for myself, but it is so that I can decompress, I can get out all of that extra nervous energy, all of the stress that I have. And interestingly, my office. So this happened to me a couple of years ago and I just thought it was hilarious. They came to me on like a Thursday and they said, So when was the last time you had a really busy schedule, Rachel For the last couple of weeks, trial and all this. When was the last time you went for a long run?

Rachel King:
And I was like, Well, I like a really long time ago. You see my schedule. And they said, Well, we think we're going to clear your Friday morning and and you should go for a run. And I was like, Oh, wonderful, this is a great idea. I think I at that point thought it was like I had the most thoughtful staff ever, right? Like, of course I want to do it. And then afterwards, they said that they could tell that I was more irritable. I started having my patients tested. I was not nearly as understanding with my clients. It was coming out and they need it. Like it was like exuding this stress level. And they needed me to go for a run so that I could get it all out. And that was when I really realized how important running and physical activity was to how what kind of boss I am, what kind of attorney I am, and I expect what kind of wife and mother I am as well.

Brian Kelly:
Wow, that is phenomenal. So you get up so in the morning, is it like the very first thing you do? I mean, or do you give yourself time to wake up a little bit?

Rachel King:
I get my kids ready for school and then they walk out the door at 715. And then between 715 and like 815, I use it for me and I, I do whatever it is on the planet, whatever is on my schedule. I also because I said I live in die by my calendar on Sunday nights. I look at my calendar for the next week and I plan my workouts for the week. So if I have like nothing to do on a monday morning, I'll maybe do my long run if I am very short on time or I of course, then maybe I'll just do like a 20 minute yoga session or something like that.

Brian Kelly:
Very cool. And you do that in your office, in your home, or do you go to a gym? How does that work?

Rachel King:
I do it in my way. I like to work out outside. So it's either outside. I'm super fortunate. Southern California typically allows for outside workouts, but actually, you know, we've had like so much rain that I have contemplated getting a gym membership just for the week, for the year that I can't do it. But now I work out at home or outside, I run outside.

Brian Kelly:
That's fantastic. And I love it because you start off the day that way and that gave you that one bit of success. So I mean, this is fantastic. I've never heard anybody doing this, but you've literally set yourself up for success that day. Yes. You cannot not have a successful task or something that happened that day because you've already completed it. That is. I love that attitude because, yeah, you don't always have the perfect day. It could be the rest of the day sucks, but at least you had that one success and you can pat yourself on the back and give it yourself that that participation trophy trophy. I hate those for doing so. And I love how your staff basically that sounded like an intervention.

Rachel King:
It was so I really was like, Oh, I really need running. Like, I really it was truly. Brian the first time that I realized how important exactly what you say is like your your body does actually affect your mind and ultimately your business and every area of your life. And we hear it. But to actually live it and to have this difference and to have it be so significant that they rearranged my calendar and we're like, Please go. And then I'm thinking like doing something I love, right? But it was it was very eye opening and now it it made it even more important. I think that was the takeaway. Like it made it so that it wasn't really something I wanted to do. It was something I needed to do for my own success. And it was just as important as marketing, quite frankly.

Brian Kelly:
It sounds like you had very loving and supportive staff to do that, that they had that forethought and that that tells me that you are one incredible leader for them to have that reaction to you. So it all it all it all comes from the top. And so kudos to you. That tells me right then and there what your leadership style is is phenomenal, especially for the group that you have in your in your business right now. So I allow you I give you permission to give yourself credit for being a phenomenal leader. And. Yes, yes. Oh, it's Lauren, Hood says, I used to love reading actual books. Now I'm an audible person. Yeah. And I've actually read a physical book for the first time in years, not too long ago. But it was only because I wanted to read it really bad and there was no. Audible version of it. So I literally sat down, my wife's watching TV and I've got earbuds and listening to music to cancel out the TV. I just love being with my wife. I don't care what we're doing. We don't have to be talking. As long as I'm near her, I am fulfilled. I love it and I want to talk to her and all that too. It's just I don't have to be to have that just feel good. So I just sat down there and I'm reading the book and highlighting, well, she's watching TV and we're like two feet apart, right? It's so funny. But yes, your Army career, seven years. What spurred you on? What was what made you think, hey, I think I want to enlist in the Army today. What was going through your mind when that happened?

Rachel King:
Well, it was not like a pretty picture. It wasn't bad. But I was 18 and I wanted to go to college. Well, I thought I well, I'll say I thought I wanted to go to college. And so I did. I enrolled in college in school. And I quickly found out that I didn't really like going to class. I was not mentally ready to go to college, so I didn't go to class. And about a month and a half or two months into the semester, my parents basically said, No more, you can't do this. You are supposed to be going to school and cut me off financially. And it just wasn't working right and that was okay. It was a good decision. It was probably the best decision that they could have made for me at that time, given the kind of person I am. So I did some different things. At one point. I had no place like I had no place to live. I had no job prospects. Life is very expensive and you don't realize it when you're that young. And so I walked into the I bet I knew a lot of people that were in the military because I was in Southern California with the Marines and the Navy. So I went to I thought about it. I went and talked to the recruiters, and I went to Maps, which is the military entrance. Military entrance processing station, I think is what it stands for. And they said, well, we can get you to boot camp in six months. And I said, Yeah, so I don't have a job and I don't have a place to live. And so if you don't get me to boot camp within two weeks, I'm going to have figured out my plan B. As I have to. So you need if I'm going to join, like if this is going to be it, you have to I have to go now. And they did. And the reason I chose two weeks is because I figured I could go back to my mom with a military contract signed and say, can I please stay here for two weeks? I'm going into the military. So they did, and it worked. And my mom, she let me come home for two weeks and then I shipped out. So it was kind of a necessity thing. I didn't really know what to do. And I knew I wasn't ready to go to college. I knew I wanted to be an attorney or I had a feeling that I wanted to be an attorney. But that's so much school. And I just, quite frankly, was not ready.

Brian Kelly:
Interesting. So what was your parents reaction when you first let them know that you were enlisting?

Rachel King:
Well, I'd already signed the contract because I am definitely a person that just makes I'm very definitive. So, like, here it is. I'm very decisive. So I didn't tell them in advance. And I don't come from a military family. So I had a bit of mixed reaction. I have divorced parents, so I had mixed reactions from different sides. There was a bit of worry. It was shortly after 911, so that was a lot of uncertainty. So I think there was some fear there. And and again, we didn't have military in our family, so nobody knew what to expect. I think they were very shocked. I don't think they ever thought that. Rachel King, this person that does kind of whatever she wants, would go in and voluntarily take orders. But I did it and it all turned out okay. I think in hindsight they realized that it was a really good decision and I grew up a huge amount very quickly. So I think now they're thinking it's great.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah, and I hear that a lot about the growing up part, you know, becoming I haven't again, I haven't met a a veteran who has not had a higher level of seemingly maturity and discipline than most of the rest of the population that I deal with. And so for you, when you came out of the Army and everything you learned how to or what specifically, if you can think of one or two things that that the Army did for you that you are able to carry over into your business and personal life that were very positive, what would those be?

Rachel King:
I think the discipline, I definitely think the ability to embrace the suck, like you learn that in the military. And actually my husband and I talk about it quite like when things suck, you kind of have to embrace it. Boot camp. There was like really bad things that happened. It was really hard. Being in the military is can be really hard and you just kind of embrace the suck and you get through it. And on the other end, I think what I learned in the military is that. You can look back and be like, Wow, that was such an interesting, maybe not great experience, but it was such a unique experience. And even more than anything, like, I did it, like I made it through. I embraced the stock and on the other side of it. So I think that's the big the big one. From a business owner standpoint, I actually hated it when I was in the Army. They didn't like these mandatory fun days. And as an 18, 19, 20, you just like, who wants to go hang out with all of these people you just want? I just wanted to go party. But now that I own a company, I really bring through the the camaraderie and the importance of morale within the company and the idea that mandatory fun is really that's kind of what the concept is. It's not really about having the day off to go sit at the beach together. It's really about creating this morale and this camaraderie so that you can work together as a team to accomplish the business mission. And so I think those are the two big things that I take away from and that I only would have learned in the military.

Brian Kelly:
But gosh, I mean, embrace the suck. That sounds like a book title right there. Maybe I'll maybe.

Rachel King:
Maybe I'll write one.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah. That's the first time I've heard that. That was funny. I love that. But camaraderie and morality. Wow. How you can take what you've learned in the military and not just learn, but lived and carry that over into your business. And obviously the results are showing based on that one intervention that happened on that day to clear off your Friday so you could do the long run. So very intriguing. And I love it. You know, I've heard of other veterans say that people don't want to hire them because they're veterans. And I'm like, what the heck? You've got to be kidding me. It should be the opposite of vet. It would be somebody I would want with my business. I mean, I get it. Some come with with stress and issues from being in combat. If they saw combat, I get all that too. But the same time I would want to support nobody other than a vet because of their they're like, you like with all of your commitment that you made to this country for us, you did it for yourself as well. And we all know that. But but you took a step that a very small percentage of people do. And I appreciate that.

Rachel King:
Thank you. I think. I hope that veterans don't feel like nobody would hire them because they're a veteran. I hope that it's really more of a I don't it's really hard to transition out. I wanted out of the military so badly I was ready. I got I did not want to be told what to do one more day of my life. But even still, I was really surprised at how hard the transition was. And it took me almost five years to really be at a point where I was like, I'm never going back into the military. For five years after I got out, I kind of would think, Oh, maybe I should go back. Oh, I really miss this. Oh, I want to go back like I had this draw. And I don't think that people realize how hard sometimes the transition is. And when you're applying for jobs, you are looking for that same camaraderie, You're looking for it. And it can be really it can be hard as a veteran or somebody that was in to kind of present themselves and into a company in a way that's private sector rather than the military institution.

Brian Kelly:
Wow. And I hope.

Rachel King:
They don't feel that way. Like, I love veterans and we all do.

Brian Kelly:
So yeah, definitely. And I mean, yeah, so they might be ones to come in and help to build the culture of the company for you, You know, if that's the big draw on what you missed the most and that's what seemed to come up to the top, maybe that's a perfect role for them in an in a company to maybe either examine their culture and then take it to the next step and see what can we do to make it more cohesive.

Rachel King:
Absolutely. And now culture, work culture is like one of the most important things for innovation, for business strategy, business plan, like everything kind of revolves at this point, at least around business culture and being able to figure out how you can lead balance, kind of being a boss but fulfill people's inner needs to become the best possible thing. Spurring innovation like all of it can be quite a challenge. And I think the military do a pretty good job of it. So it's a really good job for a veteran.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah, And retention, right? Because there's such a churn rate these days, people going in and getting a job and leaving six months later go to the next job. That would also help that because, you know, you create a culture where there's camaraderie, morality and and also you're giving them. Responsibility to take and be creative with their individual tasks to own it without micromanaging them. That's one thing I found was very powerful. They love what they get to do If you're not looming over them like you would be in the military where they're telling you everything you have to do, when to do it and and so on. So. Yeah. Oh, okay. Amy Yeah. She was back about the escape or embrace the suck. Yes. New book.

Rachel King:
Yes, that's right.

Brian Kelly:
And again, thank you, Amy. For what if it all goes right the song and the the reference to the book. That's amazing. I'm in the same Facebook group now, and it's it's a really cool thing. I was telling Rachel. Amy. Yes. We're talking to people that are watching the show that aren't even on the show. I was telling Rachel that I'm now reading that book for the second time. It's an amazing book. So and Amy has not she has done She has actually performed. Recorded a song called What If It All Goes Right. It's it's awesome. A great music video. She's on the beach. It's really cool. My goodness. I want to talk about your business, Rachel. I know. I mean, my God, I could talk to you all night because that military background, I just I'm always so curious. I mean, my dad was in the Air Force. He didn't do a whole lot. He sat behind a desk. I shouldn't say he didn't do a whole lot. He didn't go out and fly an airplane because he failed a physical and it was due to a speck in his eye or something ridiculous. But I'm always curious what impact that has from each individual's perspective. And so far it's pretty much been a similar impact and it's all been positive knowing that, yeah, the experience wasn't always fun, but the result was very positive. What you came out of, you know, you went in as Rachel King, you came out as Rachel King, Version 2.0.

Rachel King:
Yes. Yes.

Brian Kelly:
So cool. I want to find out more about your law firm, what you do, who you help, what is your client base. And if you have a success story or two you'd like to share with us that really moves your motor or whatever, then I think we'd all love to hear that too. And what I'll do is I'll pull up your website and yeah, please let us know what it is you do, who you cater to. And then while we're showing the website, we'll also let people know how to connect with you should they need your services. Does that sound cool?

Rachel King:
That's awesome. Yeah. Thank you.

Brian Kelly:
All right, let's do it. Go ahead and take it away.

Rachel King:
I am a strategic litigator, so I actually do. It's also called a trial attorney. I'm sure you hear that on TV a lot. I do. Strategic litigation in Family law probate, which also includes conservatorships, elder law, elder abuse and guardianships. And I do real estate litigation. So when there is a conflict, I help people resolve it. I really am a problem solver. I've never found I've never had any person come into my office and say, here's the problem and not have a solution. So I'm very solution driven. Oftentimes that is going to trial and all of that. But let's see how we can do this and and solve your problem in those areas. So I absolutely love what I do. Strategic litigation is where I focus on the client's wants and needs for their life. And then we position the facts, which we can't change, can't change the facts, and we try and present both in a way to the court or to the other side or to the jury in a way that is going to maximize the law on my client side so that ultimately they get the solutions that they are looking for. And I practice in California, Arizona, Kentucky and Texas in those areas. I love. I guess my success story is it's a fairly recent one is an elder abuse case. I think elder abuse is way more prevalent than we all think. It is not always the scam of the prince from who knows where asking for money. Oftentimes it's just. Something very, very close, very close to home. So recently I was representing a family where the house was taken from these two. Seniors. So seniors in the law are 65 or older and they didn't own it anymore. And they became aware of it because the bank informed them that there had been this change, There had been some awkward activity. And so they started to look into their finances and they found out that they didn't own their house anymore. It was not in their name then. And so we were starting the proceedings and then one of the one of my clients died. So we didn't have their testimony anymore because they couldn't so they couldn't say to the court, I'd never signed this.

Rachel King:
I never wanted this. This was not I did not want to give away my house. Then we get and this might be close to your you, Brian, then the other spouse, living spouse gets very serious dementia. I can't remember anything. So we're now going to trial at a point where the surviving spouse can't remember, can't testify. And I have to somehow prove to the court that when they signed these documents five years ago, they had they had no intention of doing it. And on its face, it's presumed that they had intention. They signed them. We were able to get the house back. We were able to recover it. Now, this my surviving client, she's doing great. And she can pass away in her own house and leave it to the people that she intended to leave it to. And so that just really makes me happy when I can help somebody who was specifically seniors who get taken advantage of oftentimes by their family or their close friends or their caregiver and and make sure that they have what they need all the way to the end of life.

Brian Kelly:
Oh, that is an inspiring story that that really requires a celebratory bomb run. It does. Have to. Yes. The great cocaine dropping smart bombs, bombs of wisdom's value, bombs, you name it. And that's fantastic. Yeah, that hit close to home. And yeah, boy, if if we had detectives, that would take it to the next step. We have a very inundated sheriff's department here where I live, one of the busiest in all of California, which is saying a lot because I live in a desert community. They are phenomenal people. I met many of them during all of this in person, you know, nose to nose. And I was blown away by our law enforcement and how much they truly care. As busy as they were. I mean, I had them coaching me on how to do things. And I'm not going to say what those were because I don't know if they were all what they should be coaching me. They were doing it out of love of family and wanting to help. And I was just like, You guys are and gals are phenomenal. And so I have an unbelievably even more heightened respect for law enforcement, at least in our area. I just I'm all for them. They are phenomenal. So I just wish we'd get to that point where we had enough going on, where then I could go, okay, Rachel, come step in. We need your help.

Rachel King:
And here's the thing. So it's obviously illegal to steal people's money, right? It's illegal to defraud. It's illegal to do all of these things. But we have a very impacted criminal system and there's a different burden. It's beyond a reasonable doubt. You can still sue and sometimes get financial recovery, get the House back through civil court much faster than somebody would have been prosecuted criminally for it. And you don't have to do both. So you don't actually have to wait for the criminal system to come into play. They might or they might not be. You can still recover financially, get the house back, try and get the money back, which is a civil court issue.

Brian Kelly:
Okay. Yeah, ours was all done over the phone and he sent literal cash in the mail and to fictitious people we have addresses. I mean, you have no idea the amount of evidence that my brother and I compiled over the time that this happened and sent it all to the to the detective. But they just they have other things like murder going murder. Right. And, you know, bigger grand theft, you know, a lot of a lot more than this was about $30,000 when it was all said and done that they extracted from my dad. And yeah, it was a long story and it's awful. And he was in denial, thought he was doing a business deal, and all of us became his enemy because we told them You're being scammed. And he had weapons. He had one in his car. So I stopped going near him and staked him out from afar. It was horrible. And but just you know what? I looked at it all and I said, I know that this is happening for a purpose. And the great thing is, you know, any issue that happens after this, it will be child's play compared to what, you know, what this just went through. So it's setting me up to have thicker skin for whatever goes ahead. So I just kept trying to keep that upper lip, even though it isn't always easy.

Rachel King:
No, you know what?

Brian Kelly:
Do it.

Rachel King:
Your dad is so lucky to have, like, children that care because so many times they don't. Children don't care. And that's when really people get taken so advantage up to the point where they don't have any money to live off of. And then what do they do then? I mean, that's just devastating. So honestly, I think he's he may never know that how lucky he is to have you guys. You did a great job and you deserve a pat on the back now for what you did. Thank you for that, because that's really amazing and it's really challenging.

Brian Kelly:
And really it's a good ending so far is that the moment I was able to find a way to get his cell phone turned off, I had got his I literally yanked his phones out of the wall in his house. He had they were ringing off the hook from lots of people, but this one guy befriended him and kept him on the phone all the time. Once I got that phone turned off and he realized that he could no longer talk to this guy, it like snapped him out of the trance or whatever he was in and he was fine and he got better. And now he absolutely loves the help that I provide because now he's in another home and I go and do his prescriptions and other things and take care of them. And every time he's happy to see me. So, so far, so good.

Rachel King:
On that is good. Very good.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah. So it's better than what it was because I was getting ready to say, here's you know, you got a little bit of money left to live on and we'll just make sure that's being paid for. But yeah, but not enough to do that. Well, good for you.

Rachel King:
That's good.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah. And my brother and I grew up looking up. Of course, he's always our dad and we loved him and still do so. Oh, my gosh. So I promised everyone before this show is over, I'd show them away. They could win a five night stay. Oh, get it in the camera at a five star luxury resort, compliments of the big insider secrets. You see that red and white stamp looking logo up there? That's my good buddy, Jason Nast. That's his company who is getting married in February. I'm so. Decided for him on a cruise and we've been invited. We're going to go on and be there with him. And so to celebrate that, you should enter to win. And how do you do that? I'm going to put it up on the screen and all you need to do is write it down and enter after the show is over. Because I end every show with a very profound and phenomenal question, and Rachel is going to answer it absolutely immaculately. So I can't wait for that either. Before we do that, though, I'm going to show you how you can win that five night stay at a five star luxury resort. I'm going to put it up on screen. Remember, write it down, go to it after we close the doors to this show for the evening. All right. We'll be monitoring for the winner and we'll have a winner chosen randomly. You do not want to miss this. So here it is. I'll bring it up on the screen right now. What you want to do is write this down. You're going to go to our IP dot. I am forward slash vacation, all lowercase, no capitals, our IP that stands for Reach your peak, which is my company report. I am forward slash vacation and just go to that URL after you hear Rachel's amazing answer to this very profound question. That's coming up right about now. Okay. Before I do that, I want to let you know a couple of things, Rachel. First of all, this question, it's incredibly it has been very powerful. The cool thing about it is there is no such thing as a wrong answer. It doesn't exist. In fact, the exact opposite is true. The only correct answer is yours. It's it's going to be pertinent to you. And if it takes you a moment to come up with an answer or if you get it instantly, that also is absolute perfection because it is your answer. There's no way to fail. Pretty cool.

Rachel King:
Huh? Yeah. I'm kind of nervous.

Brian Kelly:
Even with all that. The buildup gets everybody every single time. That's why I do it. It's fun. And now she's thinking. I don't want to be on this show anymore.

Rachel King:
All the things running through my head that it could possibly be. Right.

Brian Kelly:
And yeah, it's phenomenal. Amy answered this question. Amy Scruggs She did phenomenal. Every person does. You will. You will, too. There's no problem. So with that, all that wonderful buildup, are you ready?

Rachel King:
Yes.

Brian Kelly:
Ooh, I love that. That's the decision maker right there. All right. Rachel King. How do you define. Success.

Rachel King:
I define success. I define success by being the trying to become my own hero. But what I mean by that is picturing the kind of person that would be my hero or that I would want to that I would absolutely look up to, and then constantly striving and working to reach that so that I would ultimately be my own hero. If that makes sense. I don't know if that even makes sense. No, See, now you have one wrong answer, Brian. One wrong answer.

Brian Kelly:
No. Still correct? Still correct. You know how we close it and how we confirm that it's correct.

Rachel King:
How?

Brian Kelly:
You probably guessed it. Final. No, that's phenomenal. Rachel, in so many ways, because one of the things I've noticed with especially successful individuals such as yourself, which is the only people we have on this show and, you know, success is very what's the word, It's specific to each person. No one person can define what success is for someone else. And your definition of success that you just said today will definitely change in five years, maybe less. And it changes over time. The greatest thing I've noticed is not a single person that I've had on the show define success as having to do with making a lot of money. Isn't that interesting?

Rachel King:
And then probably no matter how much money they have. Right.

Brian Kelly:
And, you know, and even so, if you're just starting out in your scarcity mode, money is more in your in your mind's eye. And I love this. The lesson for those of you that might be starting out right now or in the beginning stages of your business is already instill in yourself the why. Why do you do what you do and not make it about the money. Even though money is it has to be part of your focus because it's survival. Just like Rachel went through that time or she had to get into the military or it was going to be crunch time. And figure. Out something else, You might have to go eating bugs off the ground or something. Who knows? But we get that that every one of us goes through that stage in the beginning when you're starting up. But I always have in mind, what is the reason you're doing it? And I love that to be your own hero. That is not a wrong answer. That's a perfect answer to continue to improve and strive to. And you know, you have it sounds like more than one child. You have a husband and they're looking at you. They're watching you, especially the kids. And what you do is important. And you're already doing you're obviously doing something phenomenal just by the reaction of your staff. That was it was like all I needed to hear to know how wonderful you are. Oh, look at this. You're Here we go. Come on. Here we go. Great answer, Rachel. You've got a lot of support out there. Amy Scruggs says, Brilliant answer, Rachel, and just keeps going on. So, yes, thank you for that. Because your mind gave you the first answer that it came up with. I do NLP, I'm certified in it. And oftentimes the first thing that comes in our mind that is the right one. That's why it came. That's why you said it is perfect for you and you're looking to build a legacy. You're also looking to improve. And again, it was money centric and that is that just speaks volumes about you as a person in great ways.

Rachel King:
Yeah, because money comes and goes, you can always earn more money, right? It's not that money's not important, but you can always earn more. So what else? There's got to be something else with it.

Brian Kelly:
Yeah. And so what I want for you more than and I'm sure everyone that is in your corner is for you to have a thriving and ever growing business. And why do I say that? Because of your heart. You will then be able to serve more people. So if your business does not grow, it's a disservice to those who need your help.

Rachel King:
Oh, that's very. I like that. That's yes, I think that's true of every every business, really. Every business owner.

Brian Kelly:
If if they.

Rachel King:
If yes, if they if they have if their heart is in it I suppose they.

Brian Kelly:
Have the right motives. Yeah. And most entrepreneurs, I think darn everyone I've had on the show is here because, you know, we are successful because we take the servant attitude toward our business. We are here to help serve people and money happens as a result of a transaction of trade and value. But it's not the focus, even though, yes, we need it. As we've already stated, Rachel is also a generous person. Miss April's dancers love it. So it's a love fest. Now, here we go. That's fantastic. So. Well, you know what? We went a little over time, and I'm fine with it because the great thing about this whole interface is I don't have to pay for studio time. It's like we go another hour or two, which I really could with you, Rachel. But to respect everybody out there and don't forget to enter to win that vacation stay, I hope you wrote that down. Our waypoint am for vacation. But Rachel, one last two last things. One is what's the best way people can connect with you that may need your services? And then two, if you have one parting piece of advice to maybe someone who's just starting out as an entrepreneur or as a small business owner, what would that be?

Rachel King:
I am on all of the socials at the Lawyer King, and so you can find me on Twitter and Facebook and Instagram and all of them. I also take text messages and phone calls at 9518347715, and text messages will come to my cell phone so you can text me directly, I would say. That being resilient is probably the most important thing that anybody that is in business or is considering getting in business or is in business can learn or read about you. In my experience with representing clients and working with business owners and owning companies, if you are not resilient, your business is not going to be successful.

Brian Kelly:
Could not agree more. That's some of the most sound advice you could have ever given. And I appreciate you and thank you once again for serving. Think your husband. Thank you for helping and serving others through your practice. And yeah, let's just all give Rachel a big round of applause, virtual and otherwise. And we appreciate you, Rachel. Thank you so much for coming on. We got to call it a night. So on behalf of the amazing Rachel King, I am your host, Brian Kelly of the Mind Body Business Show. Until the next to me is an entrepreneur shows up on this side of the stage. We will see you again very, very soon. And till then, do two things. Number one, go out and serve more people and crush it. And number two, above all, be blessed, everyone. So long for now. Good night.

Rachel King:
Good night.

Brian Kelly:
Thank you for tuning in to the Mind Body Business Show podcast at www.TheMindBodyBusinessShow.com my name is Brian Kelly.

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